Career and Mentoring

One of the most frequent requests from undergraduates when they speak to alumni is for assistance with career planning, internships, mentorships, and job placement. They also want advice from alumni regarding graduate school and/or post graduate degrees.

In response, the Career Development Committee, chaired by Tom Silver ’81 and Rob Novo ’79, launched a pilot mentorship program in January. The pilot program matched alumni and undergraduates with similar career interests, academic backgrounds, and experience.

If you are interested in participating in any of the above, please contact Tom Silver ’81 at tsilver10359@yahoo.com or Rob Novo ’79 at robn1979@gmail.com.

More than 20 undergraduates were matched with alumni, and as of the end of March, approximately 80% have initiated contact and have had meaningful, productive conversations. The feedback on these conversations has been extremely positive, with both alumni and their mentors indicating that they are excited about the relationship and that they have scheduled follow-up discussions and, in some instances, face to face meetings. The Career Development Committee continues to work through logistics to get the remaining mentor/mentee relationships established and expects more connections to occur before the end of the school year.

Looking forward, the program hopes to take advantage of the developing Tech Center. This will allow for easier and more frequent alumni/undergraduate communications that promote even more meaningful relationships between undergraduates and alumni, including potential career “days,” specialized workshops, and other events to link alumni and undergraduates.

If you are interested in participating in speaking to the undergrads, please contact David DellaPelle at david.dellapelle@gmail.com.

Thank you, all of the alumni who volunteered to be mentors. Your time and expertise is greatly appreciated. The Career Development Committee continues to be in need of alumni who would be willing to assist undergraduates in career planning, whether it be through a mentorship, offering career advice, linking undergraduates with internship connections or opportunities, providing assistance to undergrads in networking, or even participating in a formal or informal program to provide insight on your industry, job, or career path. Think of how helpful such a resource would have been when you were an undergraduate!

Q: How often do I have to interact with my assigned mentee?
After initial contact, the program is very flexible and depends on your and the undergraduate’s expectations. We suggest communicating at least every other month by phone or by e-mail. Note: The undergraduates carry the primary responsibility to reach out to alumni.

Q: What are my responsibilities as an alumnus?
We hope you can share insights of the industry you work in, especially around recruiting. Note: You are obviously not responsible for finding your mentee a job, but we hope that you can help him find one or help him network.

Q: What is my time commitment as alumnus?
After initial contact, the program is completely flexible; the more time you put in, the more you and your mentee will get in return. We suggest interacting at least every other month. We believe the technological enhancements coming to the house through the efforts of the Technology Committee will facilitate interaction between alumni mentors and their undergraduate mentees. We are hoping that some communication takes place at least every other month.

Q: What if I would prefer a different undergraduate?
We do our best to find good matches based on industry, career interest, and personality. However, if you feel uncomfortable with the undergraduate we assigned to you, feel free to reach out to us, and we will do our best to accommodate you.



 

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